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Givs

Yes 

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Impact of humic acids on the colonic microbiome in healthy volunteers

CONCLUSION: Humic acids have a profound effect on healthy colonic microbiome and may be potentially interesting substances for the development of drugs that control the innate colonic microbiome.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28223733/?i=183&from=humic%20acid

Fulvic acid promotes extracellular anti-cancer mediators from RAW 264.7 cells, causing to cancer cell death in vitro.

Fulvic acid promotes extracellular anti-cancer mediators from RAW 264.7 cells, causing to cancer cell death in vitro.

“The FA-CM augmented MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis; however, an NO inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (NMMA) slightly inhibited the FA-CM-mediated MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by low levels of NO. In the present study, we found that FA induces the generation of NO and iNOS in RAW 264.7 cells by inducing NF-κB activation; however, NO did not significantly stimulate MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis in the current study. In addition, FA-CM enhanced cell death in various human cancer cells such as Hep3B, LNCaP, and HL60. Taken together, FA most likely stimulates immune-modulating molecules such as NO and induces cancer cell apoptosis.”

Humic acid inhibits HBV-induced autophagosome formation and induces apoptosis in HBV-transfected Hep G2 cells.

Humic acid inhibits HBV-induced autophagosome formation and induces apoptosis in HBV-transfected Hep G2 cells.

This is very interesting in vivo research.  From the abstract, the researchers wrote

“Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) utilizes several mechanisms to survive in the host cells and one of the main pathways being autophagosome formation. Humic acid (HA), one of the major components of Mineral pitch, is an Ayurvedic medicinal food, commonly used by the people of the Himalayan regions of Nepal and India for various body ailments. We hypothesized that HA could induce cell death and inhibit HBV-induced autophagy in hepatic cells……These data showed that HA induced apoptosis and inhibited HBV-induced autophagosome formation and proliferation in hepatoma cells.”

Humic and Fulvic Acid Investigated for Osteoarthritis and Hay Fever, others

A recent review in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that there may be more new evidence supporting humic and fulvic acid’s roles in supporting health.

“Humic substances are effective in the suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity, rat paw oedema, a graft-versus-host reaction and contact hypersensitivity in rats. They reduce the C-reactive protein levels of patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee and the wheel and flare reaction of patients suffering from hay fever. They have also been described as cardioprotective and pro-angiogenic. Toxicity studies have indicated that potassium humate is safe in humans up to a daily dosage of 1 g/kg, whereas fulvic acid is safe in humans up to a daily dosage of 1.8 g per adult. The antiinflammatory action of potassium humate can be contributed to the inhibition of the release of inflammatory-related cytokines, an adhesion molecule, oxidants and components of the complement system.”

 

Dr Richard Laub Discusses Humic and Fulvic Acid for Human Health.

Dr Richard Laub was researching humic acid for many years. When a pharmaceutical company (and now, more than one) began researching synthetic oxyhumates for drug discovery, he began his own research into the natural earth mineral compounds in humates and their effects on human health. The results are simply stunning.

http://www.fulvicmineral.com/uploads/6/7/7/3/6773870/fulvic_and_humic_-studies.pdf

Lead Binding to Soil Fulvic and Humic Acids: NICA-Donnan Modeling and XAFS Spectroscopy.

In a study published in the journal Environmental Science Technology the activity of different kinds of humic acid forms are compared in terms of their ability to bind to lead (Pb).  The group found that “Pb binding to humic substances (HS) increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040886